Crisis Response

When a crisis hits the community, The Salvation Army responds quickly.   One way that The Salvation Army assists is with the Community Response Vehicles.  These kitchens-on-wheels are dispatched to the designated locations or reception centres with teams of trained Emergency Disaster Services (EDS) volunteers who immediately set up food and support services alongside other agencies.

Our Provincial Mandate

In major disasters, such as the BC wildfires in 2017, we get called to help from the Province of British Columbia.   The Salvation Army Emergency Disaster Services and other agencies have specific roles recognized by the province.     Our assigned role is feeding and emotional support services.    During past wildfires, we attended reception centres, providing food, Meet and Greet services and emotional comfort and counselling.  Our mobile kitchens were set up in areas to provide food and refreshments for displaced residents and emergency workers as well.

Our Local Mandate

We provide the same support in our local community in times of emergency.     We could be called by the fire department, Emergency Social Services or for a search and rescue incident. When we get the call, we bring the mobile kitchen to the location and our volunteer team sets up whatever food services are needed. We feed the emergency responders and evacuees, making sure that they have hot or cold drinks and snacks, and, where needed, a hot meal. We also attend situations where flooding has forced evacuations and bring food and support to the evacuees. We can provide basic needs such as donated clothing and furniture to displaced people.

“Without a doubt, the agency that impressed me the most on this assignment, and continually impressed me on so many fronts, was The Salvation Army. When the logistical dilemma of unloading, sorting, storing and maintaining goods arose, The Salvation Army accepted the immense responsibility despite the fact that it was beyond the scope of its commitment as a partner agency in ESS. In addition to this issue, The Salvation Army did incredible things in their Personal Services role, as did the folks manning the food trucks.”

Mike Andrewsin an article for the Emergency Social Services Association

There are several types of volunteer opportunities with the EDS program:

  • Driving the truck
  • Mechanical assistance
  • Feeding the first responders and public
  • Providing emotional and spiritual care support

Please Note:  there are courses available for a variety of services within the EDS program.

Please contact Ian Pollard – Executive Director at 604.852.9305 ext. 126 or Sylvia – Volunteer Coordinator at ext. 129.